Adam Leech exhibition

Collaboration with Adam Leech. 2010, Belgium.
Role: Camera work, compositing and editing.

Adam Leech show “The Host with the Most” at Netwerk Centre for Contemporary Art, Aalst, Belgium.
In the videos Blanket Apology and Standard Triangulation he focuses on rhetoric and diversionary tactics, but also upon slips of the tongue and jumps of contradictory thinking.

Adam Leech (b. 1973, Chicago, lives and works in Brussels) only shows new works. It is his first major solo exhibition in Belgium. The artist – who studied at the Art Institute (Chicago), the Rijksacademie (Amsterdam) and at HISK (Antwerp) – has exhibited regularly at home and abroad: at the last edition of Manifesta (Tirol, 2008), the Tirana Biennale (2009) and the Moderna Museet (Malmö, 2009).

blanket-apology

Blanket Apology 2010, 5’ loop
Blanket Apology, a video in which the artist orchestrates a tightly shot public confessional scene, forms the second part of the Speech Bubble trilogy. It is a dialogue between a woman and a man about over-mediasized confessions. As in the first part of the Speech Bubble trilogy, Leech focuses on the ambiguity of public apology.

Standard_triangulation

Standard Triangulation 2010, 16’ loop
Presented in an ingenious mise-en-scene, he introduces in the video Standard Triangulation, the concept of triangulation. Such a “trialogue” can describe social, as well as legal, governmental or family situations better than a dialogue.
A jazz singer is shown. While she performs jazz standards, she’s distracted by something off screen. The artist examines in the video the process of vision and inability to grasp what the person actually sees. In this way he calls upon curiosity and the desire to look at the other.

Adam Leech - hindu blues

Hindu Blues 2010, 1’ loop
Hindu Blues brings into view the loss of spiritual control in an absurd way. In the Hindu faith the tilaka – a red dot on the forehead – symbolizes the third eye associated with multiple gods and the idea of meditation and spiritual enlightenment. In the past only gods, priests, ascetics and worshippers wear a tilaka. Now it is an ordinary practice for Hindus and is regarded as a beauty mark. In the video a naughty goddess plays with the tilaka of a woman who does everything she can to set her tilaka back in the right place.